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Dam’s role in water supply to be studied

City may need more than well water in the future

January 29, 2013

Engineers will again be taking a look at the Hydroelectric Dam that spans the Des Moines River in Fort Dodge....

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(16)

richgetricher

Feb-05-13 12:17 PM

bingo KIR and TE

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keepitreal

Feb-01-13 6:38 PM

$17,800 to study the Dam....I think I have a vague memory of the last study. next another company will get paid $15,000 to do a study of the study and then of course they will pay some other jokers about $11,000 to study the two previous studies and then when its all said and done a 4th grader will come up with the same conclusion for free....the****is a piece of crap!

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Anderson

Feb-01-13 5:44 PM

Strange, it came up now on my search: walking as on two legs, gssmms. Dates me, of course!

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gssmms

Feb-01-13 3:27 AM

Rain barrels and whale oil lamps I got. Is a "shanks mare" a type of lawn mower? Can't get that one nailed down.

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Anderson

Jan-30-13 2:09 PM

Just pulling your leg a bit, gssmms, as I remember when agriculture really stripped the land of its productivity and the countryside was pretty foul. And I don't cotton much to all the environmental hysteria, having experienced the "good old days." So, hail Gore, full of grace - and pocket full with $100 million in fossil fuel jack! Google those "antique" terms if you wish.

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SharonO

Jan-29-13 8:15 PM

Sewer water at Cargill is sent back to the city for treatment. Process water is treated on site and ties in to public works for the UV Treatment before discharge. Has anyone read up on Cargill and thier community works. They are pretty dedicated to recycling and taking care of the environment plus they do alot of volunteer and donate alot of money to the communities they operate in

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gssmms

Jan-29-13 5:17 PM

Pondering the fact that water never really is “consumed” but rather brought in, used, incorporated, disposed of, etc… we have a good idea of where most of the 3 million gallons the city uses goes.

Other general questions I’ve had today on this article are:

Where does the water go that gets pumped out to the Ag Park? Is it treated and re-used? Is it dumped somewhere? What does the wastewater contain in the form of chemicals and by-products? Where does it go?

Since 5.5 million gallons must come in… what happens to it?

Anyone know?

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gssmms

Jan-29-13 5:10 PM

BTW: I really DO wish the Messenger had some software that would allow editing of a post... even if only for grammatical corrections. I'll have to be more diligent next time.

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gssmms

Jan-29-13 5:08 PM

As often as I’ve agreed with your comments and complimented you on your intelligent discourse, Anderson, I must humbly admit that I don’t have any idea what those items are. Is it a safe guess that you’re using extremes to cast a shadow of hypocrisy on my comments. If you’re asking me if I support and use concepts of permaculture, sustainability, pasture based meat production, water & carbon sequestration, compost for heating & gardening, etc… then no. I’m not the first. People have been doing this for thousands of years. I’d delighted to be more and more a part of, what I believe, are the solutions… and less and less a part of the problems.

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Anderson

Jan-29-13 4:46 PM

gssmms: And I'm sure you'll be the first to revert to a the rain barrel, whale oil lamps and the ever ready shanks mare! Do you have any idea of the water it takes to make a ton of steel and rest of the car you drive - or is it a bicycle? As Teddy Turner. running for Congress where I live, as a conservative Republican, no less, there's something odd about his old man, Ted of CNN fame, driving his Prius to get aboard his privet jet.

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gssmms

Jan-29-13 1:25 PM

Anyone who understands the principle and peril of "deferred maintenance" knows that our current systems of agriculture are building to a crisis we can't 'fix' later.

The soil depletion, the water consumption & polution, the manure lagoons, the CAFOs, the financial subsidies, the governmental corruption and the diesel fuel required to keep this charade going are all screaming to us: "STOP!! YOU'RE GOING THE WRONG WAY!!"

In the meantime, the "leaders" will continue to squander tomorrow's resources for the promise (real OR unrealized) of a few dollars... then they'll label it "success" or "progress." Crazy and sad.

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gssmms

Jan-29-13 1:09 PM

Does anyone else find it INSANE that 2 companies are EACH going to consume as much fresh water as the entire city? A few paychecks get created and the water supply for the city is going to be squandered! Not to mention the destruction to the land with GMO Crops & poisonous sprays! The real problems here are NOT a few dollars of worthless fiat currency spent on studies... but the systematic destruction of the ecology. (Just like in the coal mines in the SE USA and the rain forests around the world.) Progress and economic development? I think NOT! (At least, according to Fierke, it's a decade away, so it won't really matter, huh?!?!)

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TAXEDENOUGH

Jan-29-13 12:08 PM

Another study? This is like a money tree for consultants and engineers. It just keeps on giving. The engineering firm will say we need to fix it, then will have to hire them again for building specs, then will have to hire them again to find a suitible contractor, then will have to hire them again to over see the construction, and then will have to hire them 5 years down the road when this don't work out to study a new plan. But I guess it's only taxpayer money so who cares.

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Anderson

Jan-29-13 9:36 AM

Of like mind, Skipper; the only good thing here is that the EPA isn't doing the study, for it would then take years and cost millions to keep all those bureaucrats "occupied" and in the style to which they are accustomed.

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Skipper

Jan-29-13 7:29 AM

I hope the Feds in D. C. don't hear about this situation; they'll demand these "rich companies" get their water from the local groceries, and pay huge subsidies to the companies to offset their costs - then claim its another program to stimulate the economy (at least it would help the grocer's economy. Hmmmm.

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casper

Jan-29-13 5:29 AM

A decade would give those rich companies plenty of time to build their own treatment plant for the river water.

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